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你的网络言论有可能断送你的前程

更新时间:2017-6-14 11:01:51 来源:纽约时报中文网 作者:佚名

How to Keep Your College Admission Offer: Start With Digital Literacy
你的网络言论有可能断送你的前程

Harvard has rescinded acceptance offers to at least 10 incoming freshmen who posted offensive jokes about school shootings, the Holocaust, bestiality and the death of children and minorities — among other obscene topics — to a private Facebook group.

由于在一个不公开的Facebook小组中发布有关校园枪击案、纳粹屠杀、兽交、儿童和少数族裔死亡及其他恶俗话题的恶意笑话,哈佛大学撤回了至少10名大一新生的入学邀请。

The jokes were posted in the form of memes, those photographs or images overlaid with captions that you see everywhere on the internet. That young people post offensive memes on Facebook is not news. What’s unique about this situation is that Harvard found out about incoming students who were doing so and retracted their admission, sending a strong message that this kind of behavior is unacceptable.

这些笑话是以米姆(meme)的形式发布的,照片或图像上叠加着图说,这种形式在互联网上随处可见。年轻人在Facebook上发表令人不快的米姆不是什么新闻。这件事的独特之处在于,哈佛大学发现了即将入学的学生在这么做,并且收回了录取通知,这传达出强烈的信号,表明这种行为是不可接受的。

One of the jokes referred to the hypothetical hanging of a “Mexican kid” in the school bathroom as “piñata time.” Another, an image of a Pokémon lying in bed with an erection, was captioned: “When you’re tryna sleep but your neighbor is beating his kids.” Most of the memes could not be printed or explained in this newspaper.

其中一个笑话是假设把一个“墨西哥小孩”吊在学校厕所里当成皮纳塔纸偶。还有一个笑话是一个正勃起的精灵宝可梦(Pokémon)躺在床上,图说是:“当你想睡觉可邻居在打孩子时。”大多数米姆不适合在本报上发表或解释。

This situation is a stark reminder of our collective failing to teach the first generation of digital natives — those who were born and raised on high-speed internet — that there are real-life consequences for virtual actions.

这种情况是一个严峻的提醒,那些从出生到成长都有高速互联网陪伴的孩子堪称数字时代的第一代原住民,我们却没有教会他们,虚拟行为也会在现实生活中产生后果,这是我们的集体失败。

Since Facebook became widely available, incoming freshman classes have connected with one another in Facebook groups before arriving on campus. Each graduating class usually has its own group. But splinter groups also form, and meme groups with names like “Yale Memes for Special Snowflake Teens” or “MIT Memes for Intellectual Beings and Spicy Memelords” are especially popular right now. The group that got the would-be Harvard students in trouble was a private meme group that only students who posted provocative memes could join.

自从Facebook被广泛使用以后,即将入学的大一新生班级在到达校园之前就开始用Facebook小组相互联系。每个毕业班通常也都有自己的小组。但是这些小组会开始形成派系,“特别雪花青少年耶鲁米姆”或“聪明人与荤段子米姆大师麻省理工米姆”这样的米姆小组现在尤其受欢迎。给那些准哈佛学生带来麻烦的是一个不开放的米姆小组,只有发布挑衅性米姆的学生才能加入。

You almost have to feel bad for these kids. They don’t realize: “Privacy” ain’t privacy anymore. It just means your mom might not know about something you did immediately after you did it.

你几乎肯定会为这些孩子们感到难过。他们没有意识到,“隐私”已经不再是隐私。它只是意味着你妈妈也许不能事后马上就知道你都干了些什么。

A few years ago I started teaching workshops to high school and college students about the importance of maintaining a clean digital reputation. I wanted to ensure that they learned that the things you type, post and share behind a computer screen can still impact your life.

几年前,我开始给高中生和大学生们做讲座,告诉他们保持清白的数字声誉有多么重要。我想确保他们知道,虽然躲在电脑屏幕之后,但你输入、发布和分享的内容仍然会影响到你的生活。

I am of the bridge generation that remembers life before social media permeated everything, but cannot imagine life without it now. I was a sophomore at the University of Illinois in 2004, the year “TheFacebook” launched and was made available to college students who went to Ivy League and Big 10 schools. I signed up for the new social network, and never looked back (except shadily) at BlackPlanet or Myspace.

我属于过渡的一代,所以仍然记得社交媒体渗透一切之前的生活,但是现在我已经无法想象没有它的生活。2004年,我是伊利诺斯大学的大二学生,“TheFacebook”就是在那一年推出的,当时只提供给常春藤盟校和十大公立大学的学生。我在这个崭新的社交网络上注了册,并且从来没有回头去关注BlackPlanet或Myspace(顶多怀疑地看两眼)。

When I graduated from college in 2006, I went into marketing and ended up introducing the organizations I worked for to social media. It turned out these platforms we kids were all loitering on could be used for business! It was perfect for my next move. I got a job as a marketing coordinator at a nonprofit that taught other nonprofits how to tell their stories through social media and on the web. My position expanded: I started coaching and teaching social media strategy.

2006年大学毕业时,我进入市场营销行业,最后把社交媒体介绍给了我供职的机构。原来我们这些小孩都在瞎逛的平台也可以用于商业!这对我的下一步行动堪称完美。我得到一份非营利组织的营销协调员工作,负责教授其他非营利组织如何通过社交媒体和网络来讲述自己的故事。我的职务又有了扩展:我开始指导并传授社交媒体战略。

A year into my job, I found out from my boss how he’d decided to hire me for the role. He was down to two candidates who were equally qualified but I had the cleaner online reputation, meaning that nothing weird came up when he Googled my name.

工作一年之后,我从老板那儿发现了他当初是怎么决定聘请我担任这个职务的。他把范围缩减到两个资质相当的候选人,但是我的网络声誉更清白,也就是说,当他用谷歌搜索我的名字时,没有出现什么奇怪的东西。

Today’s young’uns — would we call them Generation Z? — have more than just a few years of a digital trail. They were born into the technology age, and all they know is fast internet. This means, of course, that they will never know the trials and tribulations of leaving your computer on overnight so you could download a single song from Kazaa. They probably don’t even know what Kazaa is. But they are in the most danger in terms of their digital reputations: They can be made or broken from the permanent digital record of actions they don’t even fully understand.

如今的年轻人——我们会称他们为Z世代吗?——留下了数不胜数的数字痕迹。他们诞生于技术时代,他们只知道高速互联网。当然,这意味着他们永远都不会知道整夜开着电脑,只为从Kazaa下载一首歌的痛苦与磨难,他们可能连Kazaa是什么都不知道。但是,他们在数字声誉方面处于最危险的状态:许多他们甚至不完全理解的行为都会留下永久数字记录,这些记录可以成就他们,也可以毁掉他们。

In my workshops for young adults, the most important thing I emphasize is that anything posted online, no matter how private they think it is, is permanent.

在面向年轻人的讲座中,我所强调的最重要的一点是,任何在网上发布的内容,无论他们认为多么私密,都是永久性的。

Then I tell them how they can avoid pitfalls and big mistakes, while still staying true to themselves. I am in a great position to do that, as I make my living as a cultural critic who doesn’t shy away from speaking up and out. You do not have to be an incredibly sanitized or boring version of yourself online, I tell them. You can still show the most colorful, funny side of who you are, without embarrassing your family’s good name. But if you wouldn’t want something you posted to end up on a jumbotron in Times Square, DO NOT POST IT.

然后我告诉他们应当如何避免陷阱和重大错误,同时仍然能够坚持做自己。我是以文化批评为业的人,从不回避高声说出观点,所以我很有资格谈这个问题。我告诉他们,在互联网上,你用不着过度净化自己的言论,或是表现得极其无聊。你仍然可以展现自己最为丰富多彩、最有趣的一面,同时也不致于让家人蒙羞。但是如果你不希望自己发布的东西最终在时报广场的超大屏幕上出现,那就不要把它发出来。

With that advice, provocative memes, and that act of keyboard courage it takes to post them, become a little less attractive.

有了这个建议,那些挑衅的米姆,以及只需动动键盘的勇气就可以发布出来的东西,就不再有那么强大的吸引力了。

Digital literacy couldn’t have helped kids who thought referring to a Mexican child as piñata was funny — that’s a much deeper issue that falls on the shoulders of their families and communities. Jokes like the ones that were shared in the private group of would-be Harvard students went well beyond provocative and well into the territory of hate speech. But for your average teen, a quick class in the rules of online conduct could mean the difference between a youthful indiscretion kept private and a life derailed by immaturity that became public.

数字生活知识不能制止那些觉得把墨西哥小孩当皮纳塔很有趣的孩子们——这是一个更深层次的问题,需要由他们的家庭和社区来承担。那些准哈佛大学学生的私密小组里分享的笑话,远远超出了挑衅的范畴,已经进入了仇恨言论的领域。但是,对于普通青少年来说,关于网络行为规则的速成课,也许能让年少轻狂的言行不被公之于众,让生活不会因为不成熟的行为遭到公开而脱离轨道。

Digital media literacy is just as important as financial literacy now: Who we appear to be online can significantly impact earning power. This isn’t just a lesson for young adults. Adults are certainly making these same mistakes. But if we can teach high school and college students these lessons now, we can better prevent them from stumbling. And prevention is always better than treatment.

如今,数字生活知识与财务知识同样重要:我们在网络上的形象对盈利能力有显著影响。这不仅仅是对于年轻人的教训。成年人肯定会犯同样的错误。但是,如果现在我们对高中生和大学生传授这些课程,肯定可以更好地阻止他们犯错。预防总比治疗要好。

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